carrots is, apparently, lullish

I have turned in my chapter draft!

Yesterday morning I woke up and decided that enough was enough, that I absolutely refused to spend my weekend thinking for one more moment about the Grimms brothers or Margaret Gatty or the Child Study movement.  Refuse I say! So I stopped being such a self-defeating perfectionist and instead just finished the chapter already.

It’s not my best work, but I’m really at the point where I need outside feedback to make any progress.  And it ended up at exactly 52 pages, which is, actually, still too long yet much shorter than my previous two chapters, which were about 70 pages each.  I’ve emailed the draft to my dissertation chair and second reader, and now I’m going to forget about it completely until I absolute have to return to it.

Now I’m scurrying to edit down a paper I’m delivering at a conference in Charlotte next week, which is a little frightening.  But in the timeless words of Tim Gunn, I’m going to make it work.

So as a last tribute to the Dissertation Chapter from Hell, which is now out of my hands (at least for the moment), I will leave you with a few definitions.  The last section of my chapter is on the “secret languages” invented by children, which really fascinated scholars in the Child Study movement, and I found an article dedicated almost entirely to one of these languages, invented by two young British girls, which is called the “Berkshire gabble.”  According to the gabble:

“Goaty” (adj.) means “the kind of person who uses long words to express very ordinary emotions.”

“Lullish” (adj.) means “feeling, in going up or down stairs, that there is one more step (thinking there is, and taking it).”

“Sabba” (adj.) means “individual house smell.”

“Thuks” (n.) means “an inexplicable feeling about an old blue pump.”

I’m not sure why these girls felt the need to designate words that are obviously not adjectives as adjectives, but I must say, I have been lullish more than once in my life.

Oh, and I have posted the new pick by carrots!

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